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We the People is a section of the whitehouse.gov website, launched September 22, 2011,[1] for petitioning the current administration's policy experts. Petitions that meet a certain threshold of signatures are most of the time reviewed by officials in the Administration and official responses are then issued, but not always, as outlined in the Criticism section.[1] Criminal justice proceedings in the United States are not subject to White House website petitions. In fact, no real processes of the federal government are subject to these White House website petitions; they are a public relations device for the present administration which permits citizens to express themselves. On August 23, 2012, the White House Director of Digital Strategy Macon Phillips released the source code for the platform.[2] The source code is available on GitHub, and lists both public domain status as a work of the U.S. federal government and licensing under the GPL v2.[3] The use of any automated means such as robots, spiders, scrapers or any other automated access tools to this web site for any purpose without our express written consent is prohibited, may result in severe civil and criminal penalties and prosecuted to the maximum extent possible under the law. UPDATE 8

Key lime mango cheesecake at Cheescake Factory  /  image by Yovav Gad   /  source UFOToday.com   /  license CC BY-NC-ND

This image was taken using Apple iPhone 7, Lens model iPhone 7 back camera 3.99mm f/1.8, shot at 3.99mm, Exposure set to auto, program AE, 0.025 sec, f/1.8, ISO 25, Focus set to manual range, single, Flash set to auto, did not fire, Originally created on March 11, 2017 2:43 PM, Edited on March 11, 2017 2:43 PM with 10.2.1, Original upload size 2.38 MB, MD5 signature 30d05b8288ec30e619e2540509c66e0d

Ultimate red velvet cheesecake at Cheesecake Factory  /  image by Yovav Gad   /  source UFOToday.com   /  license CC BY-NC-ND

This image was taken using Apple iPhone 7, Lens model iPhone 7 back camera 3.99mm f/1.8, shot at 3.99mm, Exposure set to auto, program AE, 0.008 sec, f/1.8, ISO 40, Focus set to manual range, single, Flash set to auto, did not fire, Originally created on March 11, 2017 2:48 PM, Edited on March 11, 2017 2:48 PM with 10.2.1, Original upload size 2.02 MB, MD5 signature 662f21c18c9d9c0a520cc387f4f5fc7b

We the People is a section of the whitehouse.gov website, launched September 22, 2011,[1] for petitioning the current administration's policy experts. Petitions that meet a certain threshold of signatures are most of the time reviewed by officials in the Administration and official responses are then issued, but not always, as outlined in the Criticism section.[1] Criminal justice proceedings in the United States are not subject to White House website petitions. In fact, no real processes of the federal government are subject to these White House website petitions; they are a public relations device for the present administration which permits citizens to express themselves. On August 23, 2012, the White House Director of Digital Strategy Macon Phillips released the source code for the platform.[2] The source code is available on GitHub, and lists both public domain status as a work of the U.S. federal government and licensing under the GPL v2.[3] The use of any automated means such as robots, spiders, scrapers or any other automated access tools to this web site for any purpose without our express written consent is prohibited, may result in severe civil and criminal penalties and prosecuted to the maximum extent possible under the law.

We the People is a section of the whitehouse.gov website, launched September 22, 2011,[1] for petitioning the current administration's policy experts. Petitions that meet a certain threshold of signatures are movst of the time reviewed by officials in the Administration and official responses are then issued, but not always, as outlined in the Criticism section.[1] Criminal justice proceedings in the United States are not subject to White House website petitions. In fact, no real processes of the federal government are subject to these White House website petitions; they are a public relations device for the present administration which permits citizens to express themselves. On August 23, 2012, the White House Director of Digital Strategy Macon Phillips released the source code for the platform.[2] The source code is available on GitHub, and lists both public domain status as a work of the U.S. federal government and licensing under the GPL v2.[3] The use of any automated means such as robots, spiders, scrapers or any other automated access tools to this web site for any purpose without our express written consent is prohibited, may result in severe civil and criminal penalties and prosecuted to the maximum extent possible under the law.

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Streets of Jerusalem  /  image by Yovav Gad   /  source UFOToday.com   /  license CC BY-NC-ND

This image was taken using Canon PowerShot SD1400 IS, Exposure set to auto, not defined, 0.017 sec, f/8.0, ISO 80, Focus set to one-shot AF mode, very close range, single, Flash set to off, did not fire, Originally created on February 21, 2016 3:57 AM, Edited on March 01, 2016 1:52 AM with ACDSee 15, Original upload size 3.34 MB, MD5 signature 6598e82602a13b750e2f7ac7cbad406c

 

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We the People is a section of the whitehouse.gov website, launched September 22, 2011,[1] for petitioning the current administration's policy experts. Petitions that meet a certain threshold of signatures are movst of the time reviewed by officials in the Administration and official responses are then issued, but not always, as outlined in the Criticism section.[1] Criminal justice proceedings in the United States are not subject to White House website petitions. In fact, no real processes of the federal government are subject to these White House website petitions; they are a public relations device for the present administration which permits citizens to express themselves. On August 23, 2012, the White House Director of Digital Strategy Macon Phillips released the source code for the platform.[2] The source code is available on GitHub, and lists both public domain status as a work of the U.S. federal government and licensing under the GPL v2.[3] The use of any automated means such as robots, spiders, scrapers or any other automated access tools to this web site for any purpose without our express written consent is prohibited, may result in severe civil and criminal penalties and prosecuted to the maximum extent possible under the law.

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Last updated 2 days ago on July 18, 2017 at 10:01 PM PDT

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